Exploring the History of Medicine and Law

Dr. Lynne Curry has spent the past year immersed in researching and writing on the historical intersections of law, medicine and society, particularly as they pertain to children. In February she gave a paper entitled, “From Religious Freedom to Medical Neglect: Faith, Medicine, and Children’s Rights in the Twentieth-Century United States,” at King’s College in London. ¬†Dr. Curry developed an essay from that paper that will be published in a forthcoming volume on religion in American life.

This statue in London's Trafalgar Square was enigmatically titled "Powerless Structures" by its Danish creators, Elmgreen and Dragset.  It's an interesting use of the imagery of childhood to represent Britain's rebirth after World War II. (Photo by Brandon Curry 2013. Used by permission.)

This statue in London’s Trafalgar Square was enigmatically titled “Powerless Structures” by its Danish creators, Elmgreen and Dragset. It’s an interesting use of the imagery of childhood to represent Britain’s rebirth after World War II. (Photo by Brandon Curry 2013. Used by permission.)

This fall she is continuing her research on that topic, aided by Ace Graduate Assistant Emily Scarbrough, and her next step is a paper for the annual conference of the American Association for the History of Medicine in the spring. Dr. Curry’s ultimate goal is to knit several strands of her research together into a monograph that traces changing medical, cultural, and legal views of children in the United States. Meanwhile, she reviewed works by other historians for the Journal of American History, the Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, and H-Law, a listserve for legal historians; Dr. Curry also reviewed book manuscripts for the University of Massachusetts Press and Westview Press. ¬†Finally, Dr. Curry wrote an essay entitled, “Modern Reproductions: Women, Biology, and History,” that will be published in the Journal of Women’s History.

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