History Students Present Research at Booth Library Event

As a part of Booth Library’s ongoing Muslim Journey’s programming, four history students recently presented their research on various topics in Islamic History to a public audience . After presenting their research to a group which included EIU faculty, staff, students, and members of the Charleston community, the students then fielded questions during an informative discussion session. The panel was organized and moderated by Professor Brian Mann for whom the four students carried out their research projects in the F13 semester. The four presenters and their respective research projects were:

  • First year History MA student Adam Mohebbi, who discussed his research on martyrdom during the First Gulf War
  • Junior history major Taylor Yangas, who presented her research on women and women’s rights in early Islamic societies,
  • Senior history major Grant Watts, who discussed his research on the Arabs’ use of jihad during the Mongol conquests,
  • Senior history major John Proffitt, who presented his research on early Byzantine-Arab relations.

Congratulations to our four students on giving such fantastic and informative presentations!

From left to right: Jack Proffitt, Prof. Brian Mann, Grant Watts, Adam Mohebbi, Taylor Yangas (photo courtesy of Booth Library)

From left to right: Jack Proffitt, Prof. Brian Mann, Grant Watts, Adam Mohebbi, Taylor Yangas (photo courtesy of Booth Library)

Adam Mohebbi provides the audience with some background to the First Gulf War

Adam Mohebbi provides the audience with some clarifications on the First Gulf War and the tactics used by the Islamic Republic of Iran (photo courtesy of Booth Library)

Taylor Yangas discusses how the rise of Islam altered the status of women in Arabian society (photo courtesy of Booth Library)

Taylor Yangas discusses how the rise of Islam altered the status of women in Arabian society (photo courtesy of Booth Library)

Grant Watts explains the significance of the Mongol invasion on the Abbasid Caliphate (photo courtesy of Booth Library)

Grant Watts explains how the emergence of the Mongols drastically altered the history of the Arab world  (photo courtesy of Booth Library)

Jack Proffitt offers an explanation as to why the Arabs were able to quickly and effectively conquer Byzantine territory (photo courtesy of Booth Library)

Jack Proffitt offers an explanation as to why the Arabs were able to quickly and effectively conquer Byzantine territory (photo courtesy of Booth Library)

Ms. Yangas and Mr. Mohebbi field questions from the audience (photo courtesy of Booth Library)

Ms. Yangas and Mr. Mohebbi field questions from the audience (photo courtesy of Booth Library)

 

 

Graduate Student to Present at the 2014 Missouri Conference on History

The 2014 Missouri Conference on History Program Committee has selected MA graduate student Emily Scarbrough’s paper for inclusion in a panel entitled “The Search for Social and Political Equality between the Sexes” at this year’s Missouri Conference on History. Emily will be presenting her paper “Mobilizing the Ballot Battle: Women’s Suffrage and Antisuffrage Movements in Illinois” at the conference this March in Jefferson City, MO.

MOconfHIS

Student’s Honors Thesis Project Accepted for National Conference on Undergraduate Research

From more than 4,000 submissions, Mark Stanford’s Honor Thesis project “’I carry War in my right hand and in my left Peace’: George Rogers Clark and the Illinois Country Middle Ground during the American Revolution,” has been selected for presentation at this year’s National Conference on Undergraduate Research at the University of Kentucky. This is a unique opportunity for Mark to present his scholarship before a national audience of fellow undergraduate scholars and faculty.

Digital Humanities Teaching Talk: The Printed Wor(l)d before 1700

In this DH teaching talk, EIU historian, Newton Key, demonstrates how to navigate the challenging typeface and orthography of Early English Books Online (EEBO), a vast repository of books in English, 1473-1700, to search for words and images of the non-English speaking World. Maps, engravings, portraits, and even ephemera can be used relatively quickly to foster expertise in the Manchus, Mughals, Safavids, Ottomans, and beyond. EEBO (and other databases) can be integrated with other computer apps (Zotero, Wordle, Google Ngrams) even at the introductory level by students and professors across disciplines.  Talk is Wednesday, 2 March, noon, 1166 Coleman Hall (HA seminar room, SW corner Coleman).