2014 James Jones Experience of War Lecture: “Humanity’s Moral Progress and the Holocaust: An Argument Against Pessimism”

Dr. Dan McMillan is coming to campus of Thursday, November 13 McMillan poster - James Jones 2014to deliver the 2014 James Jones Experience of War lecture: “Humanity’s Moral Progress and the Holocaust: an Argument Against Pessimism.”  Dr. McMillan is the author of How Could This Happen? Explaining the Holocaust (Basic Books, 2014).  The talk will be held in the Doudna Lecture Hall at 5:00 and will be followed by a reception and book signing in the Doudna concourse. The event, which  is sponsored by the History and English Departments, the College of Arts and Humanities, and the James Jones Literary Society, is free and open to the public.

Graduate Students Attend Gala in Springfield

On Saturday, October 4 Brian Failing, Kimberly Jones, and Andrea Morgan, attended the Springfield Gala sponsored by the Graduate College at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum (ALPLM) in Springfield, IL. This event brought together about 50 current graduate students, alumni, and administrators from across the university Mr. Failing, Ms. Morgan, and Ms. Jones attended this event as representatives of their programs. Brian is a student in the Historical Administration Master’s Program and Kimberley and Andrea are students in the traditional MA in History Program. After dinner, the students had the opportunity to tour the exhibits at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library Museum.

From Left to Right: Andrea Morgan, Brian Failing, and Kimberly Jones with Abraham Lincoln and his family at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum.

From Left to Right: Andrea Morgan, Brian Failing, and Kimberly Jones with Abraham Lincoln and his family at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum.

One purpose of this event was to showcase the importance of graduate assistantships to students. Many students in the HA and History MA programs receive some form of assistantship, fellowship, or award that provides them with a tuition waiver, stipend, and real-world experience. Failing said “my graduate assistantship made my dream of earning my Masters a reality. Through this assistantship I have the ability to continue my education, pursue my research interests, and be an active practitioner in the museum and history fields.”

 

 

EIU History Professor Featured in Medieval Cathedral Exhibit

Dr. Bailey K. Young is one of the experts (the only one from North America) featured in a special exhibition opening this month in Tournai Cathedral (Belgium), a UNESCO World Heritage Site.  The exhibition presents to the general public, for the first time, the results of fifteen years (1996-2011) of archaeological study and excavation of one of Europe’s most celebrated medieval cathedrals, in its present form a mixed Romanesque (nave) and Gothic (choir) monument.

The outside of Tournai Cathedral with its Romanesque nave and soaring transept towers (dating to the 12th century), from the busy marketplace

The outside of Tournai Cathedral with its Romanesque nave and soaring transept towers (dating to the 12th century), from the busy marketplace

The excavations by the CRAN (National Archaeological Research Center) of the Université catholique de Louvain  have revealed that it was preceded on the site by six major earlier cathedrals and churches over some eight centuries, the first –an Early Christian basilica– built upon a Late Roman elite residence.  Among the particularly exciting discoveries are a step-in baptismal pool dating to the Carolingian era (ca. 800 A.D.) and the intact tombs of two 11th century bishops, who are well-known in written sources, wearing episcopal garb.

The inside of the Gothic choir (13th century)—this part has been closed to the general public since an earthquake in 2001 led to an ongoing stabilization program, as the scaffolds attest.

The inside of the Gothic choir (13th century)—this part has been closed to the general public since an earthquake in 2001 led to an ongoing stabilization program, as the scaffolds attest.

 

The CRAN is EIU’s partner in the excavation of Walhain Castle, and every year Dr. Young has brought cohorts of students from his Summer Archaeology Program in Belgium to see the progress of these excavations, with a tour by the leading archaeologist.

Dr. Bailey Young with two EIU students from the 2006 group: Jeremy Daly, a Junior History major and Niccole Hurley, a graduated (Honors) major then in our M.A. program.  She went on to get a law degree in St. Louis, where she currently practices.

Dr. Bailey K. Young with two EIU students from the 2006 group: Jeremy Daly, a Junior History major and Niccole Hurley, a graduated (Honors) major then in our M.A. program. She went on to get a law degree in St. Louis, where she currently practices.

Even when the cathedral was closed to the general public for restoration work we got a key for an exclusive visit—indeed, one year we were almost locked in!  Professor Young has also translated the fifteen explanatory panels and photo captions into English, and translated the English summary for the three-volume excavation report just published (2014).  The exhibition will be open throughout the year and into 2015.

History@EIU Interview 1.1: Jessica Nunez

Welcome to the first of what History@EIU plans as a series of interviews with students and faculty of the History Department at Eastern Illinois University. For our first interview, we sat down with Ms. Jessica Nunez, a History with Teacher Licensure in Social Science major. A senior, Jessica is the 2014 Livingston C. Lord Scholar (EIU’s most prestigious academic achievement), and winner of the History Department’s Rex Syndergaard Scholarship (awarded to an outstanding undergraduate or graduate student with an interest in teaching). History@EIU sat down with Jessica and talked about her time here at Eastern, her love of history, and her plans for the future.

Jessica Nunez, '15  (photo courtesy of Jay Grabiec)

Jessica Nunez, History ’15   (photo: Jay Grabiec)

History@EIU: Hi, Jessica. Thank you so much for taking the time to sit down and chat with us. You are about to earn your degree in History with Teacher Licensure in Social Science. Why did you choose to major in History?

Jessica Nunez: That’s a good question. Actually, when I came to Eastern, I was not a history major or a secondary teaching major.

History@EIU: So when you arrived here, did you declare a major or were you undecided?

Jessica: I did declare a major. I was a journalism major when I got here, but I had a really big interest in the social sciences. After a while, when I decided that I wanted to pursue something besides journalism, I was first drawn to sociology and psychology and I switched over to a sociology major. That’s when I found out I could get a teachers certification with it, which is unique at Eastern. Eastern, unlike most other schools, offers a choice of a History, Sociology, Psychology, Geography, Economics, and Political Science concentration with the Social Studies teacher certification option. I was a little unsure about doing the teacher certification, but I remember thinking, OK, I’m going to be a sociology major, so why not get my teacher certification with it. Let me check this out and see how it goes. So everything kind of changed, and soon after that I ended up deciding to pursue teaching.

Now why did I change to a history major? Because it’s the best of course! When I started my sociology major, I noticed out of all of the social studies classes I was required to take, I found my history classes to be the most interesting. I also noticed that my history classes laid a foundation for all my other courses. For instance, sometimes it was hard to understand what was going on in my sociology classes without taking history classes first. I decided on sociology because I wanted to study people and societies. But after taking a few history classes, I realized, for me, a history degree would be the best way for me to do that.

History@EIU: What have been some of your favorite history courses at Eastern?

Jessica: If I had to choose, there are three that really stand out. This semester I am taking the Revolutionary America class. I’ve always been really fascinated by this time period in American history and I am learning something new every day. There are many ways to approach the American Revolution as an historian and this class is really opening me up to new perspectives, ideas, and possibilities that I had not considered before. Over the summer, I really enjoyed my Arab-Israeli Conflict class. Since the conflict still persists to this day, I found this class to be one of the most useful and relevant classes I’ve taken in the history department. During the course, the professor ran an iPhone app called Red Alert which Israelis use to learn of incoming rocket fire. I downloaded it and still have the app on my phone to alert me whenever rockets are fired from Gaza into Southern Israel. Even though the class has ended, the conflict still continues and I feel like I have not left that class. I also really liked my Modern World History class. I really enjoyed this course because the professor incorporated a lot of Asian history into a modern world context. In my world history classes in high school, a lot of Asian history was overlooked or just skipped over entirely. I found this class to be very insightful and useful for my future as a potential educator.

History@EIU: Did you ever have a moment sitting in a history class when you just sat back and thought to yourself, “Wow, I love studying history”?

Jessica: Definitely. When I was taking U.S. History Since 1877 with Dr. Coit – I should have mentioned that class as one of my favorites! – at a certain point in the semester we were studying the Great Depression, and we were talking about the social changes that were going on at the time. During that discussion, he said if you want to study society, study history because a lot of it is about studying changes in societies. It was an obvious point, but it was a revelation to me at the time. Right then, I thought, ok, I have to be a history major.

Jessica (front row, second from left) and fellow majors with departmental awards received at the annual departmental banquet in April 2014.

History@EIU: What got you interested in pursuing a career as an educator?

Jessica: I think there are many reasons why I decided I wanted to pursue becoming an educator. I think it’s mostly because of the teachers I had in high school and how they influenced me, and the student-mentor relationships I had with each of them. This carried over to here at EIU, where I developed more student-mentor relationships, this time with my professors. Another reason is because I love school. I just couldn’t imagine not being in a classroom for the rest of my life! I’ve also been involved with many mentor and tutoring programs during my time here at EIU, such as University Foundations, Homework Heroes, and the Summer Institute of Higher Learning. The relationships I’ve built with students – that whole mentor relationship – gets me really excited about education, and that’s another reason why I decided to pursue a career in teaching.

History@EIU: You seem really interested in both world history and U.S. history. If you had to choose one to teach, which would it be? And have you learned something here at EIU that you think is really going to help you teach such a class? Whether that’s a specific topic or event you studied, or maybe something that happened in the classroom?

Jessica: Generally what I’ve noticed in a lot of my history classes is that they usually center around themes, not just events or particular facts, and that will carry over into my teaching. For example, when I think of my Researching and Writing History class, Dr. Key encouraged us to consider the global impacts of the triangular trade. Instead of just thinking about the trade of goods and people, he encouraged us to consider that there was also a trade of culture and ideas. When I think about history in this sort of way, facts and events become all the more interesting because they fit into a larger theme.

History@EIU: When you do start teaching, if you could have your dream job, where would it be? What kind of school and at what grade level?

Jessica: I’m secondary education, which will give me my license to teach in a high school, but I’m also going for my middle level endorsement. I’m actually leaning toward middle level right now, but I won’t know until I get out there. The classes I’ve observed that I’ve enjoyed the most have happened to have been Middle School classes, so I’m leaning toward that. We’ll see.

If I could choose where to teach, I’d really like to teach at one of my middle schools around where I grew up. I have connection already with that community and I think it would be very meaningful because some of the schools around there are struggling, not just because of the economy but because of everything that is changing in the education system. I think going back to the schools from which I came, to be able to teach there, that would be my dream. Also, I went to a magnet school when I was growing up. I would love to go back there and teach.

History@EIU: What kind of magnet school did you attend?

Jessica: It was actually a very interesting place. There wasn’t a focus like with many magnet schools, like an art, music, or science focus. Instead, the school was all about teaching students about individualism and principles related to individualism – teaching students to be respectful, resourceful, and how to manage their time. One thing that was very interesting was that we would call our teachers by their first names. I did this starting in elementary school. I think it helped build relationships with teachers, but ones with a sense of responsibility and respect between teacher and student.

History@EIU: It sounds like this magnet school experience helped shape the person you are today, at the very least with regard to your love of teaching and how you value student-teacher mentor relationships.

Jessica: Yes, definitely. The school showed how strong and meaningful the relationship between a student and teacher can be. I think that’s what I envision for myself as a future educator.

History@EIU: What advice would you give a current or prospective history major?

Jessica: First, do your work. It seems obvious, but when you engage with the readings, the homework assignments, or your professors and classmates in classroom, then you’re going to be engaged in the subject and you’ll learn. It’s not just about earning a grade in the class. Do your work, do your readings, and come to class prepared, otherwise you won’t know what’s going on and you won’t learn – which is the whole point. I’d also say reach out to professors. Reach out for those mentor relationships with professors, and even if you don’t want one, reach out when you need help. Also take advantage of every opportunity you can, because you’re only here for four years and if you’re just sitting in your room doing your homework and that’s it, you’re not growing as a student and as a person.

History@EIU: What are some opportunities you took advantage of and you are happy you did?

Jessica: If we are talking about history, there are so many things going on in the department. There’s departmental honors and independent study – where you can do your own research one-on-one with professor. There’s also History Club, Historia, and so many other things going on, like History Careers Day, lectures and events, trips, and so on. Outside the department, some of the things I’ve done have been getting involved with residential life, student housing, and stuff like that.

History@EIU: As an RA?

Jessica: Yes, I was an RA for about 2.5 years. I also worked at the Student Success Center as a Summer RA and a Peer Learning Assistant. I’m a part of NRHH – the National Residence Hall Honorary. I’m also a member of a service sorority, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, which also serves the local community, St. Jude, and Easter Seals. I think there are so many different things you can get involved with in the department and on campus that interest you. Take advantage of those opportunities because you are going to build lifelong friendships, make connections, network, and obviously build your resume as well.

Jessica (front row, third from left) with other students involved with EIU's Summer Institute for Higher Learning program (http://www.eiu.edu/success/summerinstitute.php)

Jessica (front row, third from left) with other students involved in facilitating EIU’s Summer Institute for Higher Learning program (http://www.eiu.edu/success/summerinstitute.php)

History@EIU: You are very busy in the department with your coursework, and also with extracurricular activities inside and outside the department. What do you do when you aren’t working?

Jessica: I really like to read for pleasure, not just my history books.

History@EIU: What have you been reading lately?

Jessica: Non-fiction. Right now I’m reading Where Men Win Glory by Jon Krakauer. It’s about Pat Tillman, the football player who served in Afghanistan. I’m in the middle of that right now. I also just read and really liked Outliers.

History@EIU: Ah, Malcolm Gladwell. Have you read Tipping Point?

Jessica: No, not yet. But it’s on my list!

History@EIU: Besides reading, what do you do?

Jessica: Besides reading I like to run, mostly around Charleston. I usually run down by the square, and every once in a while down the Panther Trail. It’s something I do for fun – not competitive – I run 5K races occasionally but mostly just for fun. I’m not training for a marathon or anything, but just like to run around town and the trails. I also like to make crafts and I sew. I’m in the middle of making pillows for my apartment!

History@EIU: So are you excited to be finishing soon? You’ll be graduating in less than a year!

Jessica: It’s bittersweet. I’m leaving, so it’s good to be moving on and have that accomplishment under my belt. But this has been my home for the past four years. I’ve grown a strong connection to Eastern, to my classmates, and to my professors, and I’m leaving all that behind which is really bittersweet.

History@EIU: Well, Jessica. I think that’s all the time we have. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with us and best of luck with the rest of the school year and beyond.

Jessica: Thank you so much, and thank you for taking the time to speak with me!

History Professor Delivers Keynote at the Opening Reception of Booth Library’s “Revolutionary Decade” Series

On Tuesday, September 9, Dr. Edmund Wehrle, professor of history, delivered the keynote address at the opening reception for Booth Library’s fall semester exhibition and event series, “Revolutionary Decade: Reflections on the 1960s.”

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Professor Wehrle’s talk, “No Problem of Human Destiny is Beyond Human Beings”: John F. Kennedy and the Spirit of the 1960s,” addressed how although President John F. Kennedy remains synonymous with the youthful, activist spirit of the global 1960s, opening program sheetmost historians view the 35th president as an aggressive, cold warrior who endangered the world and as a conservative Democrat who proved painfully slow to respond to the challenge of the civil rights movement. Dr. Wehrle noted how in truth, Kennedy was barely a liberal and certainly no radical. International communism, Kennedy believed, presented a grave, existential threat, and he showed little real interest in domestic reform. Nevertheless, Professor Wehrle pointed out how Kennedy’s rhetoric and carefully cultivated image inspired many — especially young people around the world — and in that sense helped inspire the tumult and even the revolutionary spirit of the 1960s.

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“Revolutionary Decade: Reflections on the 1960s” at Booth Library

Booth Library’s new exhibit and program series, “Revolutionary Decade: Reflections on the 1960,” will be taking place throughout the Fall semester. Throughout the series, faculty and students will take “a fresh look at the achievements, tragedies, triumphs, extraordinary personalities, and everyday lives of average people during what was arguably one of the most turbulent and eventful decades of the 20th century.”

Booth Fall 14

Many members of the History Department faculty, along with some of our graduate students, will be participating in the “Revolutionary Decade” programming (for the full schedule of events, please visit the exhibit homepage on the Booth Library website):

Tuesday, Sept. 9, 7 p.m Booth Library West Reading Room
Opening Night/Reception
-Dr. Edmund Wehrle, Keynote Address: “No Problem of Human Destiny is Beyond Human Beings: John F. Kennedy and the Spirit of the 1960s”

Tuesday, Sept. 23, 4 p.m., Booth Library Room 4440
The Other Side of the ’60s: Hidden Dimensions of One of America’s Most Significant Decades
– Dr. Lynne Curry, “Sex, Drugs, and the U.S. Supreme Court”
– Dr. Debra Reid, “Between Cairo and Chicago: Resistance to Rights Expansion During the 1960s”
– Dr. Charles Titus, “Cold War Classrooms: How American Education Served the National Security State”

Wednesday, Sept. 24, 4 p.m., Booth Library Room 4440
MA History Student Research Panel: Global Diplomacy in the 1960s
- Moderated by Dr. Edmund Wehrle:
Kimberly Jones, “No Place Like Home: Robert F. Williams — World Exile”
- Michael Ludwinski, “The Kennedy-MacMillan Affair: The Making of a
Special Relationship”
- Adam Mohebbi, “Inaction, Not Indifference: Rhodesia and Postcolonialism in the 1960s”

Thursday, Oct. 2, 3:30 p.m., Booth Library Room 4440
Fantastic Sitcoms of the 1960s: “I Dream of Jeannie” and “Bewitched”
- Dr. Malgorzata J. Rymsza-Pawlowska, “Fantastic Sitcoms of the 1960s: I Dream of Jeannie and Bewitched

Wednesday, Nov. 12, 4 p.m., Booth Library Room 4440
Thursday, Nov. 13, 7 p.m., Lone Elm Room, Mattoon Depot

Reflections on Sixties Music
Dr. Newton Key, “Global Influences on the American Pop Charts of the Sixties”

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History Major Studies Abroad in South Korea

Taylor Coffman, a History major minoring in Asian Studies and Political Science, recently returned from studying abroad at Ajou University in South Korea. Below, Taylor tells us about her experience and why history majors should think about pursuing study abroad opportunities:

History major Taylor Coffman at Panmunjom on the DMZ

History major Taylor Coffman at the DMZ in Panmunjom

Being able to study abroad in South Korea was an experience of a lifetime. South Korea is so rich in culture, yet at the same time very modern. Studying at Ajou University in Suwon, South Korea, with approximately 100 other students from all around the world, was probably the best part of my trip. Upon returning to the United States, I have a plethora of knowledge that I gained from learning about not only Korean culture, but the culture of the other students that were a part of the program. There were students from China, Malaysia, Russia, Singapore, Canada, Australia, France, England, Spain, and Germany. Uzbekistan, the United States, Denmark, Finland, Turkey, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Puerto Rico, Taiwan, and Thailand! There were also nine Korean students who helped us with transportation, showing us around their country, and being open to share their culture with us, as well as wanting to learn about ours. I especially learned a lot from my three roommates, who were from Uzbekistan, China, and Malaysia.IMG_0035

Some of my favorite places that we visited during our six week stay include Jeju Island – where we visited a Trick Art and Ice Museum, as well as a volcano and an underground 20140723_121949cave that are both part of the “UNESCO Triple Crown New 7 Wonders of Nature,” Seoul Grand Park – which includes a zoo and an amusement park, among other neat things, the Boryeong Mud Festival – the biggest annual festival in South Korea where 20140727_193910festival-goers play in mud all day and can relax by the Yellow Sea, and lastly a professional Korean baseball game!

However, the number one place that I just had to visit during my trip to South Korea was the Demilitarized Zone, or, simply, the border between North and South Korea. One cannot visit South Korea without taking a tour to the most heavily guarded border in the world. I was even able to step over the border and into North Korea!

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Looking back on my trip, I am so beyond thankful that I had the opportunity to take part in this exchange program. I would recommend this program to anyone, especially if you are interested in Asian culture, but also want to have the creature comforts of modern life. South Korea is the best of both worlds. I learned so much more about Korean culture, and even the cultures of my peers in the International Summer School program, than I could have ever learned from any educational program in the United States. If you have the opportunity and are interested in learning about other parts of the world, I definitely recommend this trip!

 

Taylor Coffman                          IMG_0207
History Major
Asian Studies Minor
Political Science Minor