History Students Win Numerous Awards

The History Department is proud to announce that the following students recently received recognition, from outside the department, for superior scholastic, research, and service achievements. Please stay tuned for a future blog post highlighting departmental award winners who will be recognized at the annual History Department awards banquet on Friday, May 2!

Alumni Association
— History major Jessica Nunez received the Livingston C. Lord Memorial Scholarship.  This scholarship, considered EIU’s most prestigious award for academic excellence, recognizes an outstanding undergraduate student who is enrolled in a degree program leading to teacher certification and are planning for a career in elementary, middle level or secondary education.  It is the only scholarship for which the recipients are honored annually during the spring commencement ceremony.

Alumni Services
— History major Zachary Samples was awarded a Distinguished Senior Award. These awards recognize EIU seniors who have enriched the university community by demonstrating outstanding character and leadership through academic achievement, campus and community involvement, and extra-curricular honors and awards.

Graduate School
— HA graduate student Desiree Ramirez was recognized as the Distinguished Graduate Student of the Historical Administration graduate program and MA graduate student Aaron Psujek was recognized as the Distinguished Graduate Student of the MA graduate program.  These annual awards recognize one student from each of the EIU’s graduate degree granting programs.
— MA graduate students Aaron Psujek and Logan Bruce, and HA graduate student Danielle DiGiacomo, each received a Williams Travel Grant.  The Williams Travel Grant is a competitive grant which provides travel support for graduate degree-seeking candidates who have papers or creative works accepted for presentation at regional, state, national or international conferences.
— MA graduate student Nichole Garbrough was awarded a King-Mertz Distinguished Research/Creative Activity Award for her research paper “Delaware Valley Allegiances and Identity in the Eighteenth Century,” completed under the direction of Dr. Charles Foy. The King-Mertz is a competitive award which recognizes highest achievement in graduate research based on non-thesis graduate research/creative activity.
— HA alum (’89) Elaine Webster received an Outstanding Graduate Alumni Award. These awards are given to alumni who have established record of outstanding achievement in their careers, have achieved prominence in their positions and/or have achieved regional, state, or national recognition for accomplishments or contributions.

Study Abroad
— History major Mattie Korneta was named EIU’s Study Abroad Student of the Year. The award recognizesa student who embodies the values of the Office of Study Abroad and the importance of international education.

Dean’s Office, College of Sciences
— History major Michael Bradley was awarded a Social Science Writing Award for his paper “Incarcerated, Transported and Bound: Continued Resistance Amongst the Community of Transported Convicts from London to the Chesapeake, 1770-1775,” completed under the direction of Dr. Charles Foy. This competitive award recognizes outstanding research papers written in upper-division social sciences courses.
— History major Michael Olson was awarded a Social Science Writing Award for his paper “Dwight D. Eisenhower and the Suez Crisis of 1956,” completed under the direction of Dr. Ed Wehrle. This competitive award recognizes outstanding research papers written in upper-division social sciences courses.

Women’s Studies
— MA graduate student Emily Scarbrough was awarded the Woman of Artistic Vision and Excellence Award and won the Women’s Studies Essay Contest in the graduate category.  These awards were granted in recognition of Emily’s creative expression and scholarship in the field of Women’s Studies.

History Graduate Student Wins 2014 King-Mertz Award

Nichole Garbrough (MA 2014) was recently selected by the EIU Graduate School to receive the prestigious King-Mertz Distinguished Research/Creative Activity Award for her Independent Study project “Delaware Valley Allegiances and Identity in the Eighteenth Century” done under the supervision of Dr. Charles Foy.  This paper addressed the question of how and when residents of British North American changed their identities from being British to being American. Through a careful and detailed analysis of identity Nichole demonstrated Delaware’s unique history among the thirteen colonies and at the same time confirmed that its diversity and lacking a monolithic religious community or mono-crop economy were more typical of colonial America than Massachusetts or Virginia, colonies which most historians have focused their attention.

Nichole’s research for this project was done while taking Dr. Newton Key’s Early Modern England and Dr. Foy’s Early America seminars.

EIU History Club’s 1st Annual Trivia Night

The EIU History Club recently held its 1st Annual Trivia Night fundraiser. All proceeds from the event went directly to History Club and will be used for putting on future events. During the night, teams consisting of students and faculty from across campus competed against each other for prizes – with prizes awarded to the top two teams at the end of the competition. The questions might have been hard, but the pizza and good times were plentiful! The EIU History Club wants to thank everyone who turned out for the event and helping make our 1st trivia night such a success!

Congratulations to our first place team!:

Our 1st Place Team relishing  their victory!

And congratulations to our second place team!:

Our 2nd Place Team

 

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History Students Present Research at Booth Library Event

As a part of Booth Library’s ongoing Muslim Journey’s programming, four history students recently presented their research on various topics in Islamic History to a public audience . After presenting their research to a group which included EIU faculty, staff, students, and members of the Charleston community, the students then fielded questions during an informative discussion session. The panel was organized and moderated by Professor Brian Mann for whom the four students carried out their research projects in the F13 semester. The four presenters and their respective research projects were:

  • First year History MA student Adam Mohebbi, who discussed his research on martyrdom during the First Gulf War
  • Junior history major Taylor Yangas, who presented her research on women and women’s rights in early Islamic societies,
  • Senior history major Grant Watts, who discussed his research on the Arabs’ use of jihad during the Mongol conquests,
  • Senior history major John Proffitt, who presented his research on early Byzantine-Arab relations.

Congratulations to our four students on giving such fantastic and informative presentations!

From left to right: Jack Proffitt, Prof. Brian Mann, Grant Watts, Adam Mohebbi, Taylor Yangas (photo courtesy of Booth Library)

From left to right: Jack Proffitt, Prof. Brian Mann, Grant Watts, Adam Mohebbi, Taylor Yangas (photo courtesy of Booth Library)

Adam Mohebbi provides the audience with some background to the First Gulf War

Adam Mohebbi provides the audience with some clarifications on the First Gulf War and the tactics used by the Islamic Republic of Iran (photo courtesy of Booth Library)

Taylor Yangas discusses how the rise of Islam altered the status of women in Arabian society (photo courtesy of Booth Library)

Taylor Yangas discusses how the rise of Islam altered the status of women in Arabian society (photo courtesy of Booth Library)

Grant Watts explains the significance of the Mongol invasion on the Abbasid Caliphate (photo courtesy of Booth Library)

Grant Watts explains how the emergence of the Mongols drastically altered the history of the Arab world  (photo courtesy of Booth Library)

Jack Proffitt offers an explanation as to why the Arabs were able to quickly and effectively conquer Byzantine territory (photo courtesy of Booth Library)

Jack Proffitt offers an explanation as to why the Arabs were able to quickly and effectively conquer Byzantine territory (photo courtesy of Booth Library)

Ms. Yangas and Mr. Mohebbi field questions from the audience (photo courtesy of Booth Library)

Ms. Yangas and Mr. Mohebbi field questions from the audience (photo courtesy of Booth Library)

 

 

Muslim Journeys Events at Booth Library

This semester Booth Library has hosted many events as part of its ongoing program Muslim Journeys, a project of the National Endowment for the Humanities, conducted in cooperation with the American Library Association and the Ali Vural Ak Center for Global Islamic Studies at George Mason University. As the project scholar for Muslim Journeys series here at EIU, Professor Brian Mann participated in many of these events.  He delivered the keynote address at the series’ opening reception, gave public lectures on and led discussions of books about Islam and Islamic history,  and organized a research panel at which four EIU history majors presented their scholarship on the history of the Islamic World (blog post on this event coming soon!).

Prof. Mann delivers the keynote talk (Islam and the Monotheistic Tradition) at the opening reception in January (photo courtesy of Booth Library)

Prof. Mann delivers the keynote talk “Islam and the Monotheistic Tradition” at the opening reception in January (photo courtesy of Booth Library)

 

EIU faculty, staff, and students, members Charleston community, and Prof. Mann discuss Muhammad: A Very Short Introduction by Jonathan Brown (photo courtesy of Booth Library)

EIU faculty, staff, students and members of the Charleston community discuss Muhammad: A Very Short Introduction by Jonathan Brown (photo courtesy of Booth Library)

Professor Mann delivers a lecture on the origins of Islam in February (photo courtesy of Booth Library)

In February, Professor Mann delivers a lecture on pre-Islamic Arabia and the origins of Islam (photo courtesy of Booth Library)

In March, members of the EIU and Charleston community discuss The Art of Hajj by Vanessa Porter (photo courtesy of Booth Library)

In March, members of the EIU and Charleston community discuss The Art of Hajj by Vanessa Porter (photo courtesy of Booth Library)

Prof. Mann talks with members of the audience about the historical and religious significance of various Hajj rituals (photo courtesy of Booth Library)

Prof. Mann talks with members of the audience about the historical and religious significance of various Hajj rituals (photo courtesy of Booth Library)

While many of the Muslim Journeys events have already taken place, there is still time to take part in this innovative and informative series! There are three more Muslim Journeys events taking place in the coming weeks:

Tuesday, April 1, 7 p.m., Newman Center
Interfaith panel, moderated by Daniel Otto, Instructor of Philosophy
Panelists: Ms. Carly Froomkin Burak, Mr. Roy Lanham, Professor Jyoti Panjwani, Professor Jaysinha Shinde and Professor Duangrudi Suksang

Wednesday, April 9, 5:30 p.m., Witters Conference Room 4440, Booth Library
Book discussion, A Rumi Anthology, led by Dr. Jaysinha Shinde, Assistant Professor of Business

Tuesday, April 15, 7 p.m., Witters Conference Room 4440, Booth Library
Panel discussion, Women in Veil, moderated by Dr. Bonnie Irwin, Dean, College of Arts and Humanities. Panelists: Reham Hamdy Abou-Zaid, Huma Malik, Shannon Mavi

 

 

 

EIU History Department 10th Annual Barry D. Riccio Lecture

The History Department presents the 10th Annual Barry D. Riccio Lecture by James T. Sparrow, Associate Professor, University of Chicago. Dr. Sparrow’s talk, “Atomic Liberty: ‘Realism’ against Planning in the American Century,” explores the intellectual roots of foreign policy debates in postwar America. Dr. Sparrow will speak on April 9 at 7pm in the Doudna Lecture Hall. The public is invited to the lecture and a reception is to follow the event.

Visit the Riccio Lecture page at http://www.eiu.edu/history/doing_history_ricciolecture.php.

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